Claudia Mattos is a curator, writer, and researcher whose interests include the intersections of art, global politics, and emergent technologies; art as a tool of critical pedagogy; global histories of new media art; the aesthetics of the web and technological failure; and contemporary art of Latin America, the Caribbean, and their diasporas.

 

Claudia is currently serving a term as a Researcher-in-Residence at the National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, South Korea. In Fall 2019, Claudia was a Curator-in-Residence with the Shanghai Curators Lab organized between the Shanghai Academy of Fine Arts and the Shanghai Biennial.  

 

In her most recent institutional role, Claudia served as Assistant Curator of Media Arts and Live Events at The Baltimore Museum of Art, where she curated exhibitions of works by Lizzie Fitch / Ryan Trecartin and the New York collective DIS. She previously held positions at Performa, New York, and Locust Projects, Miami. She has contributed to curatorial research and writing at The Whitney Museum of American Art; Independent Curators International; Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami; and the Rubell Family Collection, among others. Since 2016, Claudia has been a regular curatorial consultant and contributor to the exhibition program at David Castillo Gallery, Miami; and in 2020, Claudia was named the gallery's Director, leading its exhibitions, programs, and new media initiatives.  

The exhibitions and projects that she has curated have been featured in The Washington Post, Artforum.com, Hyperallergic, ARTNews, Fresh Art International, WYPR's Art Matters, and others. 

She earned an MA in Art History from The Courtauld Institute of Art, London; and a BA in Art History and Visual Studies from Cornell University, Ithaca, NY.

Claudia shares a collaborative curatorial practice with Noor Alé, Associate Curator at The Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery, Toronto. Together, they curate projects, screenings, and exhibitions as AXIS

Claudia's curatorial vocabulary is intersectional and rooted in feminist, post-colonial, and queer frameworks.